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Seed Oils Are Hurting You: What You Need to Know

Seed oils have been marketed as a healthy, natural alternative to other cooking oils, but are they really so healthy?
10 Minute Read Time
Seed Oils Are Hurting You: What You Need to Know

What Are Seed Oils

Seed oils, also known as vegetable oils, are oils extracted from the seeds or fruits of plants. They are commonly used in cooking, food production, and as ingredients in various consumer products. Some common types of seed oils include canola, sunflower, soybean, corn, and cottonseed oil.

The extraction process for seed oils typically involves crushing or pressing the seeds to release the oil. The oil is then refined to remove impurities and improve its stability and shelf life. However, the refining process can also involve the use of chemicals and high heat, which can degrade the quality of the oil and reduce its nutritional value.

Seed oils are often marketed as a healthier alternative to animal fats like butter or lard, as they are lower in saturated fat. However, recent research has raised concerns about the potential health risks of consuming high amounts of seed oils. Many seed oils are high in omega-6 fatty acids, which can cause inflammation when consumed in excess. In addition, seed oils are often highly processed, which can lead to the formation of harmful compounds and free radicals that damage cells and contribute to chronic diseases.

Not all vegetable oils are from seeds but it is a general term that refers to any oil derived from a plant source. Vegetable oil can be extracted from a variety of plant sources such as seeds, nuts, and fruits. Soybean, canola, corn, sunflower, palm, coconut, olive, and peanut are among the most common sources of vegetable oil. Soybean oil is the most widely used vegetable oil in the United States, while canola oil is popular due to its neutral taste, high smoke point, and relatively low cost. Corn oil, sunflower oil, and peanut oil are commonly used for cooking and frying due to their neutral flavors and high smoke points.

Common Seed Oils:

  • Canola oil (often a blend)
  • Sunflower oil
  • Soybean oil
  • Corn oil
  • Cottonseed oil
  • Peanut oil
  • Safflower oil
  • Sesame oil
  • Flaxseed oil
  • Hempseed oil
  • Pumpkin seed oil
  • Chia seed oil
  • Black currant seed oil
  • Pomegranate seed oil
  • Watermelon seed oil
  • Kiwi seed oil
  • Mustard seed oil
  • Poppy seed oil
  • Rapeseed oil
  • Grapeseed oil

How are seed oils produced:

The process of creating seed oils involves several steps, which may vary slightly depending on the type of oil and the method of extraction. Here’s a general overview of the process:

  1. Harvesting: The first step in producing seed oils is harvesting the seeds from the plants. The timing of the harvest varies depending on the type of seed and the climate. Once the seeds are harvested, they are cleaned to remove any dirt, debris, or other impurities.
  2. Crushing or pressing: After cleaning, the seeds are crushed or pressed to extract the oil. There are several methods of crushing or pressing the seeds, including mechanical, hydraulic, and solvent extraction.
    • Mechanical pressing: This method involves using mechanical force to crush the seeds and extract the oil. The most common mechanical press is a screw press, which uses a rotating screw to crush the seeds and extract the oil. The oil that is extracted by mechanical pressing is often referred to as “cold-pressed” oil, because the temperature during the extraction process is kept low to preserve the oil’s flavor and nutritional value.
    • Hydraulic pressing: This method involves using hydraulic pressure to crush the seeds and extract the oil. The seeds are placed in a hydraulic press, which applies pressure to the seeds to extract the oil. Hydraulic pressing is often used for high-volume production of seed oils.
    • Solvent extraction: This method involves using a solvent, such as hexane, to extract the oil from the seeds. The seeds are first crushed and then treated with the solvent, which dissolves the oil. The oil-solvent mixture is then separated from the solid seed material, and the solvent is removed from the oil using a distillation process. Solvent extraction is often used for oilseeds that are difficult to press, such as soybeans.
  3. Separation: Once the oil is extracted, it must be separated from the solid material, which is typically called the “meal” or “cake”. This separation can be achieved by using a centrifuge or by letting the mixture sit and settle.
  4. Refining: After the oil is extracted, it is refined to remove any impurities and improve its quality. The refining process involves several steps, including degumming, neutralization, bleaching, and deodorization. This process can involve heating the oil to high temperatures and adding chemicals like sodium hydroxide, phosphoric acid, or bleaching agents.
    • Degumming: This step involves removing any phospholipids, which are natural components of the oil that can cause the oil to become cloudy or rancid.
    • Neutralization: This step involves treating the oil with an alkaline substance, such as sodium hydroxide, to remove any free fatty acids, which can also cause the oil to become rancid.
    • Bleaching: This step involves treating the oil with an adsorbent material, such as activated carbon or clay, to remove any pigments or other impurities that can affect the color and flavor of the oil.
    • Deodorization: This step involves heating the oil to a high temperature under vacuum to remove any volatile compounds that can cause the oil to have an off-flavor or odor.
  5. Packaging: Once the oil is refined and purified, it is typically packaged in bottles or other containers and shipped to distributors or consumers.

Negative Impact of Seed Oil Production

It’s worth noting that not all seed oils are created equal, and the specific process used to create an oil can have a significant impact on its nutritional value and overall quality. The process used to create them can have negative effects on the environment and on human health. Here are some specific examples:

Environmental Impact: The production of seed oils can be resource-intensive and have negative effects on the environment. Large-scale monoculture farming practices can lead to soil erosion, loss of biodiversity, and pollution from chemical fertilizers and pesticides. The production of some oils, like palm oil, has been linked to deforestation and habitat destruction.

Processing and Refining: The refining process used to create seed oils can involve high temperatures and the use of harsh chemicals like sodium hydroxide, phosphoric acid, and bleaching agents. These chemicals can degrade the quality of the oil and reduce its nutritional value. The refining process can also generate waste products that are harmful to the environment, such as spent solvents and sludge.

Oxidative Stress: The processing and refining of seed oils can also lead to the formation of free radicals, which can damage cells and contribute to oxidative stress in the body. Oxidative stress has been linked to a range of health problems, including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and cancer.

Why are seed oils so common?

Seed oils are inexpensive to produce, which makes them an affordable and widely available ingredient in the food industry. This affordability means that seed oils are used in a variety of food products, including processed foods, baked goods, and snack foods. Despite their widespread use, seed oils are harmful and have numerous negative effects on human health which we will explore.

What are the main negative effects of seed oils on human health?

Inflammation: Consuming seed oils contributes to chronic inflammation. This is because some seed oils, such as corn oil, soybean oil, and sunflower oil, contain high levels of omega-6 fatty acids, which will lead to an imbalance in the body between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. An imbalanced ratio will lead to chronic inflammation, which is associated with a range of health problems, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer. In addition, a high omega-6 to omega-3 ratio has been linked to an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome, which is a group of conditions that includes high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high cholesterol levels. Maintaining a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the diet is crucial for reducing the risk of inflammation and promoting overall health. Chronic inflammation can contribute to a range of health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and autoimmune disorders.

Oxidative Stress: The refining process used to create seed oils leads to the formation of free radicals, which can cause oxidative stress and damage cells in the body. Seed oils have been linked to oxidative stress when consumed in large amounts or when used in high-heat cooking methods. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the body’s ability to neutralize them with antioxidants. This imbalance can lead to damage to cells, tissues, and organs in the body. Some seed oils, such as soybean oil and corn oil, are high in polyunsaturated fatty acids, (PUFAs) which are more susceptible to oxidation than other types of fatty acids. When these oils are heated to high temperatures, such as during frying, they can break down and produce harmful compounds, including ROS, that contribute to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress has been linked to several chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.

Insulin Resistance: There is some evidence to suggest that consuming seed oils, particularly those high in omega-6 fatty acids, may contribute to insulin resistance, a condition in which the body’s cells become less responsive to insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. One study found that a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids increased insulin resistance in rats, while a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids improved insulin sensitivity. Another study found that consuming a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids, such as those found in seed oils like corn oil and soybean oil, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes.

Obesity: Consuming seed oils in excess has been linked to an increased risk of obesity. This is because some seed oils are high in calories and are often used in processed and fried foods that are also high in calories, processed sugar, and salt. Additionally, seed oils that are high in omega-6 fatty acids, such as corn oil and soybean oil, are known to be linked to an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. One study found that consuming a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids led to an increase in body weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference, all of which are risk factors for obesity and related health problems. In addition, seed oils that are highly processed and contain trans fats have been linked to an increased risk of obesity and other health problems. Trans fats can increase levels of LDL cholesterol (often called “bad” cholesterol) in the body and decrease levels of HDL cholesterol (often called “good” cholesterol), which can contribute to weight gain and obesity. Obesity is a complex condition that can have significant negative effects on both physical and mental health. One of the most serious consequences of obesity is an increased risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, and some forms of cancer. Additionally, excess weight can put pressure on the joints, causing pain and increasing the risk of developing conditions such as osteoarthritis. Obesity can also contribute to sleep apnea, mobility issues, fertility problems, and a reduced lifespan. In addition to these physical health problems, obesity can also have negative effects on mental health, including depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem, particularly in individuals who face stigma and discrimination due to their weight.

Hormonal Imbalances: Once again, when levels of omega-6 fatty acids are too high compared to omega-3 fatty acids, it can lead to an imbalance in the body, which can affect hormone levels. Hormonal imbalances can have a range of negative effects on the body, including irregular menstrual cycles, infertility, and mood changes. There is also a growing body of evidence to suggesting that consuming seed oils has a negative impact on testosterone. Testosterone plays a vital role in a range of bodily functions, including sexual function, bone density, and red blood cell production.

What are some alternatives to seed oils?

There are several healthy alternatives to seed oils that can be used for cooking and baking. It is important to choose oils that are appropriate for the cooking method and to consume all oils in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Animal fats: Animal fats like lard, tallow, and duck fat can be a healthy alternative to seed oils when sourced from grass-fed or pastured animals. They have a high smoke point, so they are a good choice for high-heat cooking methods.

Butter or ghee: Butter and ghee are high in saturated fats, but they can be a healthier alternative to seed oils when used in moderation. They have a low smoke point, so they are best used for low to medium-heat cooking.

Coconut oil: Coconut oil is high in saturated fats, but it has been shown to increase levels of HDL cholesterol (often called “good” cholesterol) in the body. It has a high smoke point, so it can be used for high-heat cooking methods like frying.

Avocado oil: Avocado oil is a good source of monounsaturated fats and has been associated with a lower risk of heart disease. It has a high smoke point, so it is a good choice for high-heat cooking methods.

Olive oil: Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fats and has been associated with numerous health benefits, including a lower risk of heart disease and improved cognitive function. It has a low smoke point, so it is best used for low to medium-heat cooking or as a salad dressing.

What does it all mean?

With that all said, while seed oils may be marketed as good source of healthy fats, consuming them will likely lead to negative health effects. The high levels of omega-6 fatty acids in some seed oils lead to chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, and an increased risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, seed oils that are highly processed or used in high-heat cooking methods can contribute to oxidative stress and an increased risk of obesity.

Choosing healthier alternatives to seed oils, such as animal fats sourced from grass-fed or pastured animals, butter, ghee, coconut oil, avocado oil, or olive oil, will help reduce the risk of the documented negative health effects associated with seed oil consumption. By making informed choices about the fats we use and the foods we eat, we can take steps towards a healthier, more balanced diet and a better quality of life.

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